Weekly Photo Challenge

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work of Art (Thanjavur Palace)

Trying to interpret the theme and selecting a fitting image from archives, took more time than usual, here issue was with options 🙂

If you ever happens to travel in the temple state of Tamil Nadu, you won’t come back empty handed, but with a bucket full of incredible images from the temples and palaces.

Let me share a few images taken during our visit to Thanjavur palace and museum.

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Weekly Photo Challenge

Weekly Photo Challenge: On Top (of an elephant)

We used envy at the mahout when ever we see an elephant, most of time during temple festivals.

Because, for us kids, it was the most prestigious job in the whole world, some one who takes care of an elephant.

Last week, just by chance I happened to see a temple festival, where three elephants were taking part in a procession.

I couldn’t resist the temptation, I just stopped my car, became part of the crowd and was reliving my childhood.

Let me share a couple of images here, of the lucky ones who were seated On Top of the mighty ones 🙂

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Weekly Photo Challenge

Travel Theme: Work

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Flowers and flower garlands are part of the daily life of most of the south Indians, especially ladies.

If you go near any temple in south India, you could see ladies making flower garlands and selling them.

They start their work so early in the morning and almost follows the temple timings.

Here I found this lady making a garland just outside one temple complex in Bangalore last weekend.

I thought of posting it as part of the “Travel Theme: Work” here.

Kerala

Temples of Kerala

Kerala is unique in many ways.

As the state lies sandwiched between the western ghats and the Arabian sea it’s almost cut off from the Indian land mass.

As it lies in the tropic and due to this unique geography Kerala receives abundant rain fall(over 3000 mm) especially during the monsoon months.

Temple architecture in Kerala is quite different even from that of other south Indian states.

From templenet.com we have the following information:

The roofs are steep and pointed, and covered with copper sheets. The shape of the roof is in
accordance with the plan of the sanctum below. With a circular plan, one sees a conical
roof, while with a square plan the roof is pyramidal. The roof is constructed with wood
and is covered with copper plates. Most of the temples seen in Kerala today, have
undergone several phases of renovation, given the perishable nature of the construction
materials.

I would like to share the photos of a few temples from the northern most Kerala district, Kasaragod.

1. Ananthapura Lake Temple :

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2. Madhur Temple :

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3. Adoor Temple :

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4. Temple near Neeleswaram

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